Easter Us Again

Easter Us Again

Ruler of the Night, Guarantor of the day . . .
This day — a gift from you.
This day — like none other you have ever given, or we have ever received.
This Wednesday dazzles us with gift and newness and possibility.
This Wednesday burdens us with the tasks of the day, for we are already halfway home
     halfway back to committees and memos,
     halfway back to calls and appointments,
     halfway on to next Sunday,
     halfway back, half frazzled, half expectant,
     half turned toward you, half rather not.

C.S. Lewis's Two Kinds of Readers

C.S. Lewis's Two Kinds of Readers
The sure mark of an unliterary man is that he considers “I’ve read it already” to be a conclusive argument against reading a work. We have all know women who remembered a novel so dimly that they had to stand for half an hour in the library skimming through it before they were certain they had once read it. But the moment they became certain, they rejected it immediately. It was for them dead, like a burnt-out match, an old railway ticket, or yesterday’s paper; they had already used it. Those who read great works, on the other hand, will read the same work ten, twenty or thirty times during the course of their life. 

God Is Younger Than We

God Is Younger Than We

G.K. Chesterton was an English writer, poet, and theologian around the turn of the Twentieth Century. C.S. Lewis credited Chesterton with moving the acclaimed creator of Narnia toward his own salvation. In many ways, the two share more than the tendency to use initials for first names. Both of their writing paints a stunning perspective of the act of creation—whether in poetry or art. To create anything is to engage in the play of God himself. Chesterton believed that the most mundane stuff of life can and should carry on the sheer delight of God as Creator. 

Addicted to Story

Addicted to Story

When I grow up, I want to be Robin Hood. I always have, and, I suspect, I always will. The Disney cartoon held my imagination as a child in an iron grasp, and, through most of my childhood, I day-dreamed of archery contests, the clash of steel-on-steel, and rescuing fair damsels. To this day, I still nurse a glowing ember of hope that one day I’ll be able to don a feathered green cap and pick up a bow. My wife, however, isn’t so keen on the career change.

Color Forgiveness

Color Forgiveness

In the weeks that led up to becoming a dad, I received a lot of well-intentioned, but largely unhelpful advice. It seemed like everyone who’d ever been spat up on, changed a blown-out diaper, or tried to comfort a colicky child took wicked delight in describing the horror ahead of my wife and me. It’s like they wanted me to regret having a child. I did my best to remain polite, but inside, I rolled my eyes.

To Serve a Dictator

To Serve a Dictator

It was a busy four years for a twenty-year-old Jew in ancient Babylon. In the time it takes most college students to figure out how to do their own laundry, Daniel had lost his parents and his home, lost his manhood, become an expert in the demonic occult, and risen to rulership in the most wicked nation the world has ever seen.

Thrive in Monotony

Thrive in Monotony

Whether we like it or not, most of life is monotonous. We do the same thing day after day, and we often feel like we have nothing to show for it. The laundry keeps piling up. The traffic on the road is always the same. The coffee pot always burns the brew. The spacebar on the keyboard at work always sticks. Life plods along the same as it always has. Often we end up wondering if there’s any value to what we do. But what if monotony itself has value? 

The Honor of “She”

The Honor of “She”

Words matter. The language we use every day shapes the way we see our world. We talk about the strength of our coffee in the morning, or the F-150 that cut us off in traffic. We share our opinions on the most recent college basketball game or describe the Pad Thai we had for dinner.

As a writer, I often thought that I controlled my words more than most people—that everything I tapped out on my keyboard blinked into existence did exactly what I wanted it to. Little did I realize that the nouns and verbs, pronouns and participles I use tell a different story about me.

An Ordinary Princess

An Ordinary Princess

You may feel like nothing you do is extraordinary, or even noteworthy. Fingers that should fly on a piano instead change diapers. A mind that could confound the best debtor instead navigates the tantrums of a willful toddler. The compassion that could bring professional peace to the downtrodden instead salves the heart of a husband who screws up more often than he would like.

Parousia

Parousia

The sun dawned pale that morning, as if afraid to disturb the peace that had settled over the house of my childhood. Birds kept their gossip to themselves, and the wind from the night before remembered a prior engagement the next county over. Perhaps the silence woke me, for I sat on the bed rubbing sleep out of my eyes when my dad cracked the door. “You’ll want to come soon. She held on through the night.”